The First Ten PR Secrets for Non-Profits

When you engage in public relations as a non-profit organization, every move must be strategic and thoughtful. The road to visibility can be long and arduous, and there is nothing more important than your reputation. For more than three decades, we have been providing counsel and service to organizations and public figures in the Christian and non-profit sectors. We’ll unfold ten things we’ve learned. Today: #1. Be One Thing.

#1 Be One Thing
Most organizations at their birth have a shining new idea and a vision for changing the world. A solution that people are willing to get behind. The founders seek to right a wrong.

Far too often, success in the journey toward that vision breeds branches in the road.

The first principle of successful non-profit public relations is to Be One Thing. Remain focused on one product, mission, ministry, or cause. We have found that the same impulses and drives that cause a visionary to begin and develop an organization often lead that founder to expand the non-profit brand by addressing additional areas of need.

This isn’t unique to the non-profit world, of course. Companies with some of the most successful consumer brands have tried to use the brand equity not just to increase the product’s market share, but also to expand what the brand represents.

Brand extension is the enemy of clear and strong identity, whether it happens at a mission or with a consumer product.

Watch for #2.

Jim Jewell

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About Jim Jewell

I am a writer and consultant on faith and public life, active for many years in management and communications in the evangelical community. I now work as the director of the nonprofit practice at The Valcort Group (www.valcort.com). Everything on this blog, however, is my personal opinion and is not read or approved before it is posted. Opinions, conclusions and other information expressed here do not necessarily reflect the views of Valcort.
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