First Ten PR Secrets for Non-profits: #6 Tell A Story

When you engage in public relations as a non-profit organization, every move must be strategic and thoughtful. The road to visibility can be long and arduous, and there is nothing more important than your integrity and your reputation. For more than three decades, we have been providing counsel and service to organizations and public figures in the Christian and non-profit sectors. We’ll unfold ten things we’ve learned.

Tip #6 Tell Stories

People will best remember your message if you illustrate it with a story. Whenever possible, tell a story. When I worked with Chuck Colson, I was continually reminded of this principle. When a reporter asked if there were inmates too tough and too bad to be reached with the Gospel, Chuck told the story of a hardened prisoner who had had his nose bitten off in fight and had later come to faith in Christ; he had become a strong leader in the prison church and a tremendous Christian witness. I’ve never forgotten that story and the image of a tough, noseless inmate ministering inside prison walls.

Jesus, of course, told stories—which we call parables—to vividly illustrate the principles of the Kingdom of God. It has that highest recommendation. And it is time tested recommendation.

Look for opportunities to tell your story–your message–in stories. The only thing people will remember longer is a good joke (but don’t try that; most of us should never rely on humor to make our points).

–Jim Jewell

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About Jim Jewell

I am a writer and consultant on faith and public life, active for many years in management and communications in the evangelical community. I now work as the director of the nonprofit practice at The Valcort Group (www.valcort.com). Everything on this blog, however, is my personal opinion and is not read or approved before it is posted. Opinions, conclusions and other information expressed here do not necessarily reflect the views of Valcort.
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