The Collapse of Principle: Opinions on TSA Invading Your Personal Space

If you’ve stopped to think about it, doesn’t it seem odd that the angst over TSA’s scans and pat-downs have come frequently from conservative Republicans, and justification of the actions have come from the Administration’s liberal Democrat defenders on national security grounds. Republican civil libertarians and Democrat national defense hawks. Hmm. What’s going on here?

NY Times columnist Ross Douthat thinks it is a broad commitment to party over ideology. He writes:

This role reversal is a case study in the awesome power of the partisan mindset. Up to a point, American politics reflects abiding philosophical divisions. But people who follow politics closely — whether voters, activists or pundits — are often partisans first and ideologues second. Instead of assessing every policy on the merits, we tend to reverse-engineer the arguments required to justify whatever our own side happens to be doing. Our ideological convictions may be real enough, but our deepest conviction is often that the other guys can’t be trusted.

How potent is the psychology of partisanship? Potent enough to influence not only policy views, but our perception of broader realities as well. A majority of Democrats spent the late 1980s convinced that inflation had risen under Ronald Reagan, when it had really dropped precipitously. In 1996, a majority of Republicans claimed that the deficit had increased under Bill Clinton, when it had steadily shrunk instead. Late in the Bush presidency, Republicans were twice as likely as similarly situated Democrats to tell pollsters that the economy was performing well. In every case, the external facts mattered less than how the person being polled felt about the party in power.

By the way, most flyers favor the security measures despite the invasion of bodily privacy. The more individuals fly, the more they prefer to be protected in the air. A recent Rasmussen poll:

Seventy-five percent (75%) of voters who fly at least once a year think it is appropriate to require some passengers to have either a full-body scan or full-body pat down before boarding an airliner. Eighteen percent (18%) disagree and say such measures are not appropriate.

Support for the techniques is even higher among those who fly once a month or more often.

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About Jim Jewell

I am a writer and consultant on faith and public life, active for many years in management and communications in the evangelical community. I now work as the director of the nonprofit practice at The Valcort Group (www.valcort.com). Everything on this blog, however, is my personal opinion and is not read or approved before it is posted. Opinions, conclusions and other information expressed here do not necessarily reflect the views of Valcort.
This entry was posted in Democrats, Jim Jewell, Philosophy, Politics, Republican, Virtue and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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